Mary and Edwin Meader Fine Art Library

KIA Library Collections

  • Books and videos: Search the library's catalog.
  • Exhibition catalogs
  • Current periodicals
  • Artist Files

    Library Hours

    Currently the Library is not open

    A new library book dropbox is in the lobby, so library materials can be returned outside of library hours.

    Book Discussions

    The library hosts Book Discussions are held at 2pm the third Wednesday of each month check out our list for more details

    Using the Library

    The library is open to the public for research and enjoyment. If you're a KIA member, you may borrow materials - just bring in your KIA membership/library card to get started.

    Contact the Library

    or click to reserve a space!


    Email
    Phone: 269-349-7775, ext. 3166

    Donations

    The Meader Fine Arts Library accepts donations of art and art history related items.

    In accepting a donation of materials, the library reserves the right to decide whether items should be added to the collection. If donated books and other materials are not added to the collection, these items will be sold on our book sale cart.

    The library cannot assess the value of a donation. There is a donation form that can be completed for your records. It is the responsibility of the donor to determine the value of the donation or use an independent appraiser to do it for them.

    We do not accept:

    • Anything damaged, or in poor physical condition
    • Anything damp, dirty, or moldy
    • Textbooks
    • Magazines
    • Cassettes
    • VHS Tapes

    Due to space limitations we cannot accept more than 2 paper grocery bags (or similar-size boxes) of donated items per person per day. If you are interested in donating more than that to the library please call 269-349-7775 ext. 3166 or email library@kiarts.org to set up an appointment.

  • New Acquisitions

    2020 Bridget Riley Cover 2020 The Cartiers Cover 2020 Vida Americana Cover

  • Bridget Riley: A Very Very Person: The Early Years by Paul Moorhouse

    "In January 1965 the international art world converged on New York to pay homage to a brilliant new star. The glittering opening of The Responsive Eye, a major exhibition of abstract painting at the Museum of Modern Art, signalled the latest phenomenon, op art and its center of attention was a young painter named Bridget Riley, whose dazzling painting Current appeared on the cover of the catalogue. Riley's first solo show in New York sold out, and, following a feature in Vogue magazine, the Riley "look" became a fashion craze. Overnight, she had become a sensation, yet only three years earlier, she was a virtual unknown. How did success arrive so suddenly?" -From book jacket


  • The Cartiers: The Untold Story of the Family Behind the Jewelry Empire by Francesca Cartier Brickell

    "The captivating story of the family behind the Cartier empire and the three brothers who turned their grandfather's humble Parisian jewelry store into a global luxury icon-- as told by a great-granddaughter with exclusive access to long-lost family archives" -From Amazon.com


  • Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925 "1945 by Barbara Haskell

    "The first half of the 20th century saw prolific cultural exchange between the United States and Mexico, as artists and intellectuals traversed the countries' shared border in both directions. For U.S. artists, Mexico's monumental public murals portraying social and political subject matter offered an alternative aesthetic at a time when artists were seeking to connect with a public deeply affected by the Great Depression. The Mexican influence grew as the artists Jose Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros traveled to the United States to exhibit, sell their work, and make large-scale murals, working side-by-side with local artists, who often served as their assistants, and teaching them the fresco technique. Vida Americana examines the impact of their work on more than 70 artists, including Marion Greenwood, Philip Guston, Isamu Noguchi, Jackson Pollock, and Charles White. It provides a new understanding of art history, one that acknowledges the wide-ranging and profound influence the Mexican muralists had on the style, subject matter, and ideology of art in the United States between 1925 and 1945." -From Amazon.com

    Be sure to check out our growing DVD collection, our circulating magazine collection, and our children's literature collection!