Mary and Edwin Meader Fine Art Library

KIA Library Collections

  • Books and videos: Search the library's catalog.
  • Exhibition catalogs
  • Current periodicals
  • Artist Files

    Library Hours

    11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays

    Art Detectives

    The Meader Library's every-month children's event offered October through May. Click here for more information

    Arty the Mouse

    Book discussions

    The library hosts book discussions at 2 pm the third Wednesday of each month from September through May.

    Using the Library

    The library is open to the public for research and enjoyment. If you're a KIA member, you may borrow materials - just bring in your KIA membership/library card to get started.

    Contact the Library

    Email
    Phone: 269-349-7775, ext. 3166

    Donations

    The Meader Fine Arts Library accepts donations of art and art history related items.

    In accepting a donation of materials, the library reserves the right to decide whether items should be added to the collection. If donated books and other materials are not added to the collection, these items will be sold on our book sale cart.

    The library cannot assess the value of a donation. There is a donation form that can be completed for your records. It is the donor s responsibility to determine the value of the donation or use an independent appraiser to do it for them.

    We do not accept:

    • Anything damaged, or in poor physical condition
    • Anything damp, dirty, or moldy
    • Textbooks
    • Magazines
    • Cassettes
    • VHS Tapes

    Due to space limitations we cannot accept more than 2 paper grocery bags (or similar-size boxes) of donated items per person per day. If you are interested in donating more than that to the library please call 269-349-7775 ext. 3166 or email library@kiarts.org to set up an appointment.

    New Acquisitions

    2019 2019 Mangum 2019 Wiley
  • Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool by Trevor Schoonmaker "Hendricks was born in 1945 in Philadelphia. His unique work contains elements of both American realism and postmodernism, occupying a space between the portraitists Chuck Close and Alex Katz and the pioneering black conceptualists David Hammons and Adrian Piper. Hendricks is best known for his life-sized portraits of people of color from the urban northeast. His bold portrayal of his subject's attitude and style elevates the common person to celebrity status. Cool, empowering, and sometimes confrontational, Hendricks' artistic privileging of a culturally complex black body has paved the way for today's younger generation of artists."
  • Where We Find Ourselves: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum 1897-1922 edited by Margaret Sartor "As an itinerant portraitist working primarily in North Carolina and Virginia during the rise of Jim Crow, Mangum welcomed into his temporary studios a clientele that was both racially and economically diverse. After his death in 1922, his glass plate negatives remained stored in his darkroom, a tobacco barn, for fifty years. Slated for demolition in the 1970s, the barn was saved at the last moment--and with it, this surprising and unparalleled document of life at the turn of the twentieth century, a turbulent time in the history of the American South."
  • Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis by Simon Kelly "Published for the artist's solo exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, this new series of paintings by Brooklyn-based painter Kehinde Wiley reenvisions the museum's holdings as a starting point for succinct observations about representation throughout the history of art. Through a process of street casting starting in 2017, Wiley invited residents he met in the neighborhoods of north St. Louis and Ferguson to pose for his paintings. The artist then created portrait paintings inspired by carefully chosen artworks in the museum's permanent collection."

    Be sure to check out our growing DVD collection, our circulating magazine collection, and our children's literature collection!