Mary and Edwin Meader Fine Art Library

KIA Library Collections

  • Books and videos: Search the library's catalog.
  • Exhibition catalogs
  • Current periodicals
  • Artist Files

    Summer Library Hours (May - July)

    11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays
    11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursdays

    The library hosts book discussions at 2 pm the third Wednesday of each month from September through May.

    Using the Library

    The library is open to the public for research and enjoyment. If you're a KIA member, you may borrow materials - just bring in your KIA membership/library card to get started.

    Contact the Library

    Email
    Phone: 269-349-7775, ext. 3166

    Donations

    The Meader Fine Arts Library accepts donations of art and art history related items.

    In accepting a donation of materials, the library reserves the right to decide whether items should be added to the collection. If donated books and other materials are not added to the collection, these items will be sold on our book sale cart.

    The library cannot assess the value of a donation. There is a donation form that can be completed for your records. It is the donor s responsibility to determine the value of the donation or use an independent appraiser to do it for them.

    We do not accept:

    • Anything damaged, or in poor physical condition
    • Anything damp, dirty, or moldy
    • Textbooks
    • Magazines
    • Cassettes
    • VHS Tapes

    Due to space limitations we cannot accept more than 2 paper grocery bags (or similar-size boxes) of donated items per person per day. If you are interested in donating more than that to the library please call 269-349-7775 ext. 3166 or email library@kiarts.org to set up an appointment.

  • New Acquisitions

    2019 04 Ruth Asawa book cover 2019 04 Art After Stonewall book cover 2019 04 Optic Nerve Book Cover

  • Ruth Asawa: Life's Work by Tamara Schenkenberg "Throughout her long and prolific career American artist Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) developed innovative sculptures in wire, a medium she explored through increasingly complex forms using craft-based techniques she learned while traveling in Mexico in 1947. In 1949, after studying at Black Mountain College, Asawa moved to San Francisco and created dozens of wire works, among them an iconic bronze fountain --the first of many public commissions-- for the city's Ghirardelli Square.

    Bringing together examples from across Asawa's full and extraordinary career, this expansive volume serves as an unprecedented reorientation of her sculptures within the historical context of 20th-century art. In particular, it includes careful consideration of Asawa's advocacy for arts education in public schools, while simultaneously focusing on her vital --and long under-recognized-- contributions to the field of sculpture."


  • Art After Stonewall, 1969-1989 by Jonathan Weinberg "Art after Stonewall reveals the impact of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender civil rights movement on the art world. Illustrated with more than 200 works, this groundbreaking volume stands as a visual history of twenty years in American queer life. It focuses on openly LGBT artists like Nan Goldin, Harmony Hammond, Lyle Ashton Harris, Greer Lankton, Glenn Ligon, Robert Mapplethorpe, Catherine Opie, and Andy Warhol, as well as the practices of such artists as Diane Arbus, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Karen Finley in terms of their engagement with queer subcultures."

  • Optic Nerve by Maria Gainza "The narrator of Optic Nerve is an Argentinian woman whose obsession is art. The story of her life is the story of the paintings, and painters, who matter to her.

    In these pages, El Greco visits the Sistine Chapel and is appalled by Michelangelo's bodies. The mystery of Rothko's refusal to finish murals for the Seagram Building in New York is blended with the story of a hospital in which a prostitute walks the halls while the narrator's husband receives chemotherapy. Alfred de Dreux visits Gericault's workshop; Gustave Courbet's devilish seascapes incite viewers "to have sex, or to eat an apple"; Picasso organizes a cruel banquet in Rousseau's honor . . . All of these fascinating episodes in art history interact with the narrator's life in Buenos Aires- her family and work; her loves and losses; her infatuations and disappointments. The effect is of a character refracted by environment, composed by the canvases she studies."

    Be sure to check out our growing DVD collection, our circulating magazine collection, and our children's literature collection!